What SMPs Do

Protect Yourself and Your Loved
Ones from Medicare Fraud


SMP Mission

Senior Medicare Patrols (SMPs) empower and assist Medicare beneficiaries, their families, and caregivers to prevent, detect, and report health care fraud, errors, and abuse through outreach, counseling, and education. SMPs are grant-funded projects of the federal U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL). Their work is in three main areas::

  1. Conduct Outreach and Education. SMPs give presentations to groups, exhibit at events, and work one-on-one with Medicare beneficiaries. Since 1997 more than 30 million people have been reached during community education events, more than 6.5 million beneficiaries have been educated and served, and more than 46,000 volunteers have been active.
  2. Engage Volunteers. Protecting older persons’ health, finances, and medical identity while saving precious Medicare dollars is a cause that attracts civic-minded Americans. The SMP program engages over 5,200 volunteers nationally who collectively contribute more than 155,000 hours each year.
  3. Receive Beneficiary Complaints. When Medicare beneficiaries, caregivers, and family members bring their complaints to the SMP, the SMP makes a determination about whether or not fraud, errors, or abuse is suspected. When fraud or abuse is suspected, they make referrals to the appropriate state and federal agencies for further investigation.


SMPs are discretionary grant projects funded by the U.S. Administration for Community Living (ACL). ACL is headed by the Assistant Secretary on Aging, who is appointed by the president and serves under the U.S. Secretary for Health and Human Services. Every three years, ACL issues a new request for proposals for the SMP program and then competitively awards grants to a selected project in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico.

  • The SMP program as we know it today was made possible by the 1997 Omnibus Consolidation Appropriation Act – legislation that formally supported enlisting seniors in the fight against Medicare fraud.
  • Since its inception in 1997, the SMP program has evolved from 12 regional demonstration projects to a nationwide program that serves every state, Guam, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C. 
  • The SMPs have been supported by an ACL-funded national resource center since 2003.  The national SMP Resource Center provides this website about the SMP program and also provides direct technical assistance to the 53 SMP projects nationwide. To learn more about The Center, click here.